Flex-a-lite Blog

  • Introducing the Flex-a-lite 50th Anniversary Camaro SS Project

    3 Comments 2012 June 14
    by admin

    We’re in the business of building performance cooling products. But every once in a while, we take it upon ourselves to build a performance car or truck to show off our wares. At the last SEMA show, we introduced a Flex-a-fit® direct-fit aluminum radiator and electric fan combination for the popular 2010-2011 Camaro. For the show, we outfitted an otherwise stock Camaro SS with the new system (you can watch the installation by clicking here). As we made preparations for our 50th Anniversary Tour, we decided to make some more modifications to the Camaro to complement the Flex-a-lite performance cooling system and help the car better fit in at the high-performance stops we have planned for the tour. Continue reading

  • Choosing the Best Flex-a-lite Fan Controller for Your Vehicle

    18 Comments 2012 May 24
    by admin

    Flex-a-lite fan controllers are much more than just a relay for your electric fans. They turn the electric fans on and off, most of them provide the ability to adjust the temperature at which the fans turn on and almost all of them take the place of relays that other brands of fans require.

    Many of our Flex-a-lite electric fans include a Flex-a-lite fan controller already, but the fans are also available without any controls.

    Here's a breakdown of what each of our controllers do so you can choose the one that's best for you... Continue reading

  • How and When to Use an Auxiliary Electric Fan

    2 Comments 2012 March 22
    by therealcoleq

    Is your car running a little hot in traffic or when you're moving slow? Is your truck or RV running hot when you are towing up a hill during the hot summer months?? Consider adding an auxiliary electric fan to help your primary cooling system.

    At slow speeds or while sitting in traffic, you have very little or no ram air coming through the radiator, and typically, the engine is running at a lower rpm, which means the belt-driven fan isn't moving much air either. In some applications, this can cause the engine to run hot or overheat because there isn't enough air moving through the radiator.

    Adding an auxiliary electric fan to the front of the radiator can overcome this problem. Continue reading

  • Battle Higher Fuel Prices with an Electric Fan

    2 Comments 2012 February 24
    by admin

    There are plenty of news stories now predicting that gas prices will top $5/gallon this summer, stirring fear and depression. This may have you thinking about giving up on that hot rod vacation, extra off-roading trip or just plain thinking of ways to cut fuel costs in your company fleet of vehicles.

    But we're here to spread some good news. If your vehicle has a belt-driven engine cooling fan, you can install an electric fan and realize a fuel economy improvement and free up some power for an overall better driving experience. Continue reading

  • New Mojave Heater Kits and Accessories Now Shipping

    Comments ON 2012 February 2
    by admin

    Flex-a-lite recently announced three installation kits for its popular Mojave heater as well as slim-profile plenum, and now all of these accessories are ready to ship! These new products make it even easier for customers to add a powerful heater in compact spaces.

    The Mojave installation kits include "Y" tubing connections, a shut-off valve, hose, clamps and grommets. Flex-a-lite offers three variations of the installation kit that make it easier to install the Mojave in place of a failed factory heater core, in a new installation where there wasn't any heater previously installed and in UTVs that use smaller diameter connectors. Continue reading

  • When 2,500 cfm isn't equal to 2,500 cfm

    3 Comments 2012 January 11
    by admin

    We've had quite a few people question our advice when we recommend a 2,500, 2,800 or even 3,000 cfm electric fan for their hot rod or 4x4. They often tell us that they have a 2,500 cfm fan now and their vehicle overheats in low speeds or when they are stuck in traffic. A little more investigative work usually uncovers that what they have now is a basket fan, which leads us to this question: Did you know that 2,500 cfm doesn't always equal 2,500 cfm? Continue reading

  • How to Install an Electric Fan Controller

    6 Comments 2011 September 22
    by admin

    Perhaps one of the least understood parts of adding an electric fan to a vehicle is installing and wiring the controller. The Flex-a-lite adjustable temperature controller turns the electric fan on and off according to the coolant temperature, and you can adjust where the fan turns on from approximately 180-240 degrees F. No relays are required if you use our controller with our electric fan. Wiring the controller is simple, and following our directions will give you years and years of trouble-free operation. Continue reading

  • Will Ram Air Burn Up My Electric Fan?

    1 Comments 2011 August 5
    by admin

    This is an interesting question that we get asked at Flex-a-lite from time to time. When you're driving on the highway, will the ram air cause your electric fan to spin, damaging it? A lot of people argue that the fan becomes a generator when it's spun by ram air, and they worry that this can damage the motor or electronic controller components. The answer is, no, ram air won't burn up your fan or the electronic controller, and here's why. Continue reading

  • Electric Cooling Fan Temperature Probe How To

    6 Comments 2011 May 13
    by admin


    Flex-a-lite's most popular fan controllers are adjustable between 160 and 240 degrees. These controllers are operated by a probe that can either be put in the core of the radiator fins or the radiator inlet. Putting the probe into the radiator fins is accurate, does not require any special tools and, when done correctly, will not damage your radiator core. You've probably been taught that radiator cores are delicate and you shouldn't touch them. The truth is that, while you do need to be careful, it's easier than you might think to push one of our temperature-sensing probes into the radiator without causing any problems at all.

    Tips for a successful fan controller installation:

    • Position the probe close to the coolant inlet (top of radiator)
    • Insert the probe until there is about an inch remaining outside of the core
    • Don't insert and remove the probe in the same position several times
    • Route the temperature probe and all wires before mounting the controller to make sure everything will reach
    • Always run the positive and negative leads from the controller directly to the battery

    As always, you can call our tech line at 253-922-2700 if you have more questions.

  • A Quick Test to See if Your Electric Fan Sucks

    1 Comments 2011 April 12
    by admin

    Here's a quick test to see if you've wired your electric fan to draw air the correct direction through your radiator, and to get a rough idea of whether it is pulling enough air to keep your car cool. All you need is a sheet of 8.5x11 inch paper, a fully-charged battery and a short safety check list.

    Turn the power to the fan on (you may have to temporarily install a manual override switch, or bring your engine up to temperature so the thermostat turns on the fan). Make sure the engine is turned off for your safety. Place the sheet of paper on the side of the radiator opposite of the fan.

    If it stays in place, you've wired the fan with the correct polarity, and the fan is moving pretty good air through the radiator.

    If it blows off, you have the fan wired backwards.

    If it doesn't blow off the radiator, but it slowly falls away, the fan isn't pulling enough air through the radiator. There can be quite a few causes for that, which we cover in the video.

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